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prson-a:

YO, DARK ACADEMIA/DEAD LANGUAGES/CLASSICS/HISTORY/LANGBLR COMMUNITY !! I DK IF ANYONE ELSE IS ALREADY HYPING ABOUT THIS BUT A TV SERIES IS GOING TO COME OUT COMPLETELY IN LATIN !!! FOR EMPHASIS: A TV SERIES, CALLED ROMULUS, ABOUT ROMAN HISTORY, C O M P L E T E L Y IN L A T I N !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

(articulo en español: https://www.google.com/amp/s/elpais.com/cultura/2019/05/30/television/1559208187_152790.amp.html

article in english: https://www.google.com/amp/s/variety.com/2019/tv/news/romulus-latin-series-origins-of-rome-gomorrah-sky-italia-itv-1203227711/amp/

article en français: https://www.google.com/amp/s/biiinge.konbini.com/actudesseries/romulus-serie-latin-producteurs-gomorra/%3famp=true )

So this is being directed by the same guy who directed Il Primo Re (“The First King”), which as far as I can tell, has not been distributed in the United States yet (so I can’t watch it 😭) but it looks great and has been getting good reviews.

As with Il Primo Re, it will not merely be in Latin but in reconstructed archaic Latin. I can’t speak for anybody else but I’ll definitely need subtitles…

On This Day | 29 May

imperium-romanum:

Map of Julian’s unsuccessful 363 CE campaign (Giorgos Tzimas).

In 363 CE, Roman Emperor Julian defeated the Sassanid army at the Battle of Ctesiphon but was unable to take the city.

Italy Still Wants the Getty Bronze, and Perhap…

Italy Still Wants the Getty Bronze, and Perhaps More:

ROME — Even as the Italian government and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles continue their decades-long legal battle over ownership of a prized bronze statue, the Italian culture ministry this week asked the California museum to review its records for four other pieces in its collection. The artifacts were stolen or illegally exported from Italy, Italian officials said.

In a letter sent to the Getty on May 9, the Italian culture ministry raised questions about a 19th century painting of the Oracle of Delphi, an ancient Roman mosaic floor decorated with the head of Medusa, and two stone lions.

Officials said that the painting, by the Italian painter Camillo Miola, was stolen in the 1940s from an institute in the city of Aversa, that the mosaic was taken from the National Roman Museum in Rome and that the two lions were stolen from a public square in the town of Preturo, near L’Aquila.

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New guided tour lets visitors walk in the shoe…

New guided tour lets visitors walk in the shoes of the Roman army:

It was a war of genocide waged against the ancient peoples of Scotland, which has largely been forgotten by history.

In the third century AD, the Roman Emperor Septimus Severus marched his legions north of Hadrian’s Wall and laid waste to the tribes of Caledonia, extending the Empire’s control all the way to the foothills of the Highlands.

And now people are being given the chance to follow in the footsteps of the imperial army as it made its way to the lands of Scotland, with a guided tour by the historian who recently researched the story behind the invasion.

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Experts say ancient head found in Rome is Dion…

Experts say ancient head found in Rome is Dionysus:

The white marble head unearthed during excavations at the Roman Forum on 24 May is believed to represent a male deity, most likely Dionysus, according to Rome archaeologists.

Initially it was thought that the head – with its feminine features and thick, wavy hairstyle – represented a female goddess.

However, thanks to a band around its head decorated with a “typically Dionysian flower, the corymb, and ivy”, it is now believed to be Dionysus, explained the director of Rome’s archaeological museums Claudio Parisi Presicce.

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Daisy Dunn put a sexed-up Catullus among the p…

Daisy Dunn put a sexed-up Catullus among the pigeons. Now it’s Pliny’s turn:

Daisy Dunn’s plan after we meet in a cafe near her regular haunt, the London Library, is to play a game of tennis. “My whole life people have always quoted Betjeman at me because I’m Dunn and there’s Joan Hunter Dunn,” she says. “So I thought I might as well pick up a racket.”

Certainly, Dunn, 30, has something of the Betjeman’s home counties heroine about her. A soft-spoken English rose, the classicist grew up in Wimbledon and now lives in Surrey. She’s absolutely not the type you’d suspect of causing a furore with her use of the f-word, but three years ago Dunn did just this.

Helen Morales holds the chair in Hellenic studies at the University of California. Reviewing Dunn’s book, Catullus’ Bedspread: The Life of Rome’s Most Erotic Poet, for the Times Literary Supplement, she criticised Dunn’s translation of Catullus’s invented word fututiones as “nine consecutive f****”.

“[Fututiones] conveys an exaggerated amount and needs translating in a way that captures the originality of the term, the excess implied and the humour in the poet’s urgency,” Morales sniffed.

For weeks afterwards, erudite TLS readers bombarded the letters page, some insisting that Dunn’s rendering was far preferable to previous attempts at conveying Catullus’s lasciviousness.

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Archaeologists discover stays of the Roman inv…

Archaeologists discover stays of the Roman invasion of Ayrshire | Infosurhoy:

ARCHAEOLOGISTS have uncovered fresh evidence of a Roman invasion of Scotland under an Ayrshire playing field.

A marching camp used by the Legions as they made their way along the coast was found by a team carrying out work prior to the building of the new Ayr Academy.

It is thought to date back to the first century AD, when an army under Agricola, the Roman Governor of Britain, fought its way up to Aberdeenshire and defeated an army of Caledonians at the battle of Mons Grampius.

It was previously thought the only two known routes for the Roman invasion were further to the east; the present-day M74 and A68 roads follow these same courses.

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On This Day | 27 May

imperium-romanum:

Procopius (Usurper).

Silver siliqua, 365-366 CE.  

In 366 CE, Procopius, usurper of the Roman Empire, died.

The Lasting Legacy of the Roman Denarius – Num…

The Lasting Legacy of the Roman Denarius – Numismatic News:

Money has sometimes been called the footprints of history.  In the case of the ancient Roman denarius, that is certainly true.

This monetary unit’s name was derived from the Latin term “deni” which means “containing ten.”  The denarius denomination was introduced in 211 B.C. during Rome’s Second Punic War.  It was initially established as the value of 10 bronze asses, though the relative scarcity of silver to copper led the denarius being revalued to 16 asses about 141 B.C.

Initially, the denarius weighed an average of 4.5 grams of high purity silver (95-98%), equal to 1/72 of a Roman pound.  For more than 150 years, its weight and purity stayed relatively constant.  Toward the end of the Roman Republican/beginning of the Roman Imperatorial era, the weight started to decline.

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On This Day | 24 May

imperium-romanum:

Aureus of Gaius (Caligula) with Germanicus, 40 CE.

In 15 BCE Julius Caesar Germanicus was born in Roma, Italy. He was a prominent general during the Roman Empire who was known for his campaigns in Germania.

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