Inscription Reveals Final Years of Life in Pom…

Inscription Reveals Final Years of Life in Pompeii Before the City Was Buried in Ash:

In the decades before the city of Pompeii was buried in ash by the cataclysmic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79, everyday life was filled with parties and struggles.

That’s according to a recently deciphered inscription found on the wall of a Pompeii tomb that was discovered there in 2017.

The inscription describes a massive coming-of-age party for a wealthy young man. who reaches the age of an adult citizen. According to the inscription, he threw a massive party that included a banquet serving 6,840 people and a show in which 416 gladiators fought over several days.

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Ancient grape grown near Vesuvius is all Greek…

Ancient grape grown near Vesuvius is all Greek to me:

By Martin Moran

“What have the Romans ever done for us?” asks John Cleese as Reg of the People’s Front of Judea in the Monty Python comedy The Life of Brian. Among the references to roads, aqueducts and sanitation, one foot soldier grudgingly cites wine. You may be disappointed to hear, however, that the Pythons employed some artistic licence on that score, as the Judeans were making wine thousands of years before the Roman empire.”

“We suspect winemaking began in the Caucasus, in Armenia and Georgia, 8,000 years ago. It then spread south through Turkey, Syria and Lebanon, and on to the rest of the Mediterranean basin, aided by the Phoenicians, who were based in what is now Lebanon, from about 1,500BC. In the Old Testament, Noah plants a vineyard soon after leaving the ark.”

“If the soldiers of the People’s Front of Judea drank wine, it would probably have been local, from the Judean Hills. I would imagine that Pontius Pilate, the governor of the Roman province of Judea, would have supplemented the local wine with some of Rome’s finest.”

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Perseus frees Andromeda from her fetters; the …

Perseus frees Andromeda from her fetters; the slain sea monster is seen at the left. From the House of the Dioscurides at Pompeii (destroyed AD 79), after a Greek original associated with the name of the late-4th-century BC painter Nicias. Height 1.22 m.

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